Information for victims with disability

What is a crime?

A crime means doing something wrong that breaks the law.

A crime is when someone

      • hurts you
      • scares you
      • makes you feel unsafe
      • tries to control you
      • keeps your property or money
      • damages your home or your things
      • makes you do something you don't want to
      • touches you when you don't want them to
      • forces you to engage in sexual activities
      • uses things like Facebook to send you nasty messages

Where does crime happen?

Crime can happen in lots of different places.

It can happen

      • at places like a local park
      • on public transport
      • at the shops
      • at school or work
      • at home

Who is a victim?

A victim is a person who had something bad done to them or their property

A victim of crime might

      • have broken bones, cuts, bruises or burns
      • feel sad for a long time
      • be frightened
      • be confused
      • feel unsafe

It is not your fault, you have the right to be safe.

What can I do?

Sometimes people do not report crime because

      • they are frightened of what will happen
      • they are worried no one will believe them
      • they do not know who to tell

If someone has hurt you or your property there are people who can help you.

Who can help me?

If somebody is in danger call 000

Contact your local police station if it is not an emergency or phone 131 444

You can also tell

What should I tell them?

      • what happened
      • when it happened
      • where it happened
      • who hurt you or your property
      • if it has happened before

Sometimes people think that telling somebody might make things worse. If you are worried about this tell the person you report the crime to.

What are my rights?

Victims of Crime - Easy read information (PDF 1,290KB)

      • You have the right to be treated with kindness and respect.
      • You have the right to be told about services that can help you and how to contact them.
      • The police will try to find out more about what happened to you and who was involved. This is called the investigation.
      • You have a right to know what is happening to the person who hurt you or your property.
      • You have a right to know if the person who hurt you is not charged.
      • You have a right to know when the person who hurt you is going to court.
      • You must go to court if the police tell you to go.
      • The court may ask you to give evidence.
      • You do not have to talk to the person who hurt you or your property.
      • You have a right to keep your details private from the person who hurt you or your property.
      • You have a right to get your property back from the police.
      • You have a right to tell the court how you felt when you were hurt.
      • You have a right to ask for money (compensation) if you or your property were hurt.
      • You have a right to ask what happened to the person who hurt you or your property.
      • You have a right to complain about what happened to the person who hurt you or your property.
      • You can ask to be told when the person who hurt you is leaving jail.
      • The Parole Board decides if the person who hurt you is allowed to leave jail early. You can tell the Parole Board how you feel.
      • You can ask if there are any rules to stop the person from talking to you or coming near you when they are allowed to leave jail.
      • You can ask to be told if the person who hurt you escapes from jail. You can also ask to be told if the person is moved to another prison.
      • You have a right to complain if you are not happy about the way you have been treated.